READ OUR BLOG



tattoo-birds.jpg
18/Nov/2021

Warning: This article mentions self-harm and may be triggering for some people.

I’ve recently had some tattoos added to my upper arms. I love them – dragons, books, peonies and symbols that commemorate my parents.

But before I got them, I had to come to terms with the fact that to show them off, people were going to see my arms. And that was a problem. You see, when I was much younger, I hated my body so much that I used to cut myself. So I have several scars on my left arm that I’m constantly covering up.

But I’m tired of hiding. It’s Australia, and it gets so bloody hot in the summer that I don’t want to wear long sleeves all the time. Plus, I wanted to get new tattoos, and my arms were the perfect canvas. So I had to accept that people might stare.

My story isn’t unique.

Sadly, many adults, teens, tweens and little kids ? have body image issues. And they cause us to do all kinds of things – from wearing baggy clothes, to excessive exercising, cosmetic surgery, unhealthy eating, comparing ourselves to others, becoming isolated, hurting ourselves – and everything in between.

So it’s time to love the bodies we’re in, and accept the diversity of bodies around us. Because they’re amazing, beautiful and wonderfully unique.

What is body image?

Basically, it’s how we see our bodies, and how we feel and think about them. It can be positive, negative or neutral. And it can fluctuate. One day you may feel really great about your body, and the next, really down on it.

Living with a musculoskeletal condition can affect the way we see our body. These conditions, the pain and fatigue they cause, as well as the medications we take to manage them, can affect the way we move, our joint structures, our weight, fitness, skin, hair and nails. And SARS-CoV-2 – the pesky virus that keeps on giving – hasn’t helped things. Over the past couple of years, many of us have experienced changes in our appearance that we may not be altogether thrilled with.

But we need to accept that our bodies change, and they’ve been changing since we took our very first breath. They change as we age, as we develop health conditions, as we take different meds, as we injure ourselves, as we exercise, lose or gain weight, get piercings or tattoos, go through puberty and menopause, as we change our hairstyle and our fashion sense…as we embrace change.

Not accepting these changes, and our bodies as they are, only leads to unhappiness. It can also cause low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, disordered eating, isolation and relationship issues.

“You have been criticizing yourself for years, and it hasn’t worked.
Try approving of yourself and see what happens.” Louise L Hay

Loving yourself

1. Be kind and accept your body as it is

This is a big one, and can be really, really difficult. Especially if you’ve had body image issues for some time. But consider this – if someone said that your bestie was ‘fat’ or ‘plain’ or ‘has horrible hands’ or ‘terrible skin’ – you’d immediately defend them. So why is it ok to say these things to yourself? Be your body’s friend and advocate, not its enemy.

“And I said to my body softly, ‘I want to be your friend.’
It took a long breath and replied, ‘I have been waiting my whole life for this.’” —Nayyirah Waheed

2. Practise every day

It takes time to change the way we see ourselves. When you wake up, and before you go to sleep, think about something you love about your body. It doesn’t have to be related to appearance – we’re so focused on that – but it could be your sick dance moves, or the way your body enables you to play a musical instrument, or walk the dog, or laugh out loud.

Write these onto post-it notes and put them on the fridge, the mirror, in the car. And read and repeat them when you need a little extra boost.

“Your self-esteem won’t come from body parts.
You need to step away from the mirror every once in a while and look for another reflection,
like the one in the eyes of the people who love you and admire you.” – Stacy London

3. Appreciate the differences

We’re all different, and that’s the way it should be. How boring would the world be if we all looked the same? Differences are beautiful.

“You are allowed to be both a masterpiece and a work in progress,
simultaneously.” – Sophia Bush

4. Be a good role model

Kids pick up on our behaviours and attitudes, and they learn from them. So avoid criticising yourself or others in front of kids. Instead, say nice things about your body and how you appreciate what it can do.

“As a child, I never heard one woman say to me, ‘I love my body’.
Not my mother, my elder sister, my best friend. No one woman has ever said, ‘I am so proud of my body.’
So I make sure to say it to my daughter because a positive physical outlook has to start at an early age.” — Kate Winslett

5. Surround yourself with positive people

It’s easier to be kind to yourself and love your body when you’re with positive people. Those who also accept and value their bodies for how amazing they are, rather than how they look. People who are critical of themselves and others are tiring, and feed our negative self-talk. So if your friend or family member is constantly berating their looks or weight, gently explain to them that you’d prefer not to discuss appearances. And move the conversation on to other, more enjoyable topics.

“I say I love myself, and they’re like, ‘oh my gosh’, she’s so brave. She’s so political.
For what? All I said is ‘I love myself, bitch!’” — Lizzo

6. Ditch the influencers and body shamers

And any other online platforms or magazines that promote idealised and unattainable body images. They just exacerbate negative feelings. Instead, find media and socials that show diverse images, and appreciate the differences.

“We come in many different shapes and sizes, and we need to support each other and our differences.
Our beauty is in our differences.” – Carrie Otis

7. Replace the time you spend criticising your appearance with happier, more enjoyable activities

Being mean to yourself can be a major time-suck. And it’s exhausting! We have enough things making us tired without adding something as pointless as belittling ourselves. So whenever you feel like you’re about to go on a self-hating tirade, do something else:

  • walk in the park and listen to the birds
  • breathe deeply and be conscious of every breath
  • listen to some arse-thumping music and dance
  • call a friend
  • take down the Empire in Star Wars Battlefront
  • cook a yummy meal
  • get your hands dirty in the garden
  • have sex!

And make sure that while you’re doing these things, you’re in the moment, not in your head.

8. Don’t compare yourself to others

We’re all different and have different genes, lifestyles, health issues and backgrounds. These things all play a part in how we look. I’m from a family of relatively short people. The only way I’m going to be tall is with the addition of very high heels ?. I also know that I’ll always wear glasses, have fine hair and be covered in tatts. It’s my make-up and lifestyle, and it’s part of what makes me, me. And that’s ok.

“Step away from the mean girls and say bye-bye to feeling bad about your looks.
Are you ready to stop colluding with a culture that makes so many of us feel physically inadequate?
Say goodbye to your inner critic, and take this pledge to be kinder to yourself and others.” — Oprah

9. Remember that images on socials are the highlights

It’s rare for people to put up images of themselves when they’re looking their ‘worst’. How many pics have been taken before the ‘right’ image was selected, filtered, touched up and then posted? They’re carefully curated to make a person look a certain way. So don’t get sucked into the madness.

“Your body. Your diet. Your life. It isn’t perfect. It never will be. But it’s real. It’s honest.
It’s beautifully flawed. And totally magical.” ― Nicola Jane Hobbs

10. Nurture your body

Feed it healthy, tasty food that makes you happy and satisfied. Move it regularly and often. Refresh it with good quality sleep. Pamper it with massage, warm baths, lotions and potions and hugs.

“You can’t hate yourself happy. You can’t criticize yourself thin. You can’t shame yourself worthy.
Real change begins with self-love and self-care.” — Jessica Ortner

11. Get help

Sometimes we need help to change the way we think about ourselves. This could be from a really good friend who you can talk openly and honestly with. Or it could be a professional. Just know that help is available if you need it. You don’t have to feel bad about yourself. Read our article ‘Support for mental and emotional wellbeing’ for more info.

And if you want to change something like your weight or fitness level for health reasons, rather than trying to match up to society’s ideals, you can get help with that too. So you can lose/gain weight safely and become more active. Talk to your GP for information and support.

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else
is the greatest accomplishment.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

12. Be patient

Changing the way you think and feel about your body will take time. So be patient with yourself. And acknowledge that there may be times when you’ll stumble and start thinking badly about yourself. But you can use any of these strategies to pick yourself up again. We’ve also included lots of great resources in the More to explore section for you to check out.

My scars, and the kick-ass tattoos nearby, are just outward representations of part of my journey. So even if people notice them and stare, I can feel proud that I’ve survived. And while I’m still very much a work in progress, I’ll continue to work on loving myself and striving to be a good role model to those people around me. At the end of the day, that’s something I can control, not other people’s perceptions of me or society’s ever-changing ideals of the ‘perfect body’.

Crisis support

If this article has raised some issues with you or you feel like you need help, contact Lifeline Australia on 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support and suicide prevention.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


GP-plan.jpg
18/Nov/2021

Ever notice how much governments love acronyms?? Unfortunately, this article is full of them, but we’ll explain what they mean and try to clear up the murky area of chronic disease management (CDM) plans, formerly called Enhanced Primary Care (EPC) plans.

Note: The primary sources for this article is the Australian Government, Department of Health’s chronic disease management resources. Unfortunately this information has not been updated since 2014. Please treat this as general information only, and discuss your specific needs with your GP.

What are CDM plans?

In a nutshell, these plans are a proactive way for you and your general practitioner (GP) to manage your chronic, complex or terminal medical condition/s. The Department of Health defines a chronic condition as ‘one that has been (or is likely to be) present for six months or longer’.

Chronic musculoskeletal conditions fit under this definition.

These plans are prepared by a GP to help eligible people manage their condition/s. The plans set goals to help people manage and hopefully improve their health and wellbeing.

There are two types of CDM plans:

  • GP Management Plans (GPMP) and
  • Team Care Arrangements (TCAs).

GP Management Plans (GPMP)

A GPMP can help people with musculoskeletal conditions by providing an organised approach to their care. It’s a plan that you’ve worked out with your GP that:

  • identifies your health and care needs
  • sets out the services to be provided by your GP
  • lists any other health care and community services you may need
  • lists the actions you can take to help manage your condition.

For example, if you have osteoarthritis in your knees that’s causing you lots of pain, and you’re no longer able to comfortably play tennis or go bushwalking, you and your doctor might decide that losing some weight will improve this situation. However, rather than just agreeing that weight loss is a good idea, a GPMP is an action plan that sets out your clear aims and objectives.

Once this plan has been developed, you should receive a copy to take with you.

Team Care Arrangements (TCAs)

If you need help from other healthcare providers to achieve your goals, your GP may also suggest a TCA.

TCA’s include 5 visits per calendar year to other health care providers. These 5 visits can be to one healthcare provider or spread between several providers.

On the first of January you become eligible for 5 new visits. You’ll need to see your GP about this.

You should also receive a copy of this plan.

Eligibility

This is one of the areas that’s a little complicated, so if you think you might be eligible, it’s best to speak with your GP directly. When you call to make an appointment, let the receptionist know that you’d like to discuss a chronic disease management plan. You’ll need a longer appointment for this.

The Department of Health states that while there’s ‘no list of eligible conditions…these items are designed for patients who require a structured approach and to enable GPs to plan and coordinate the care of patients with complex conditions requiring ongoing care from a multidisciplinary care team. Your GP will determine whether a plan is appropriate for you’. (1)

Costs

Also a tricky area. If a healthcare provider (e.g. dietitian) accepts the Medicare benefit as full payment for the service, you’ll be bulk billed and there’ll be no out-of-pocket costs. However if they don’t, you’ll have to pay the difference between the fee charged and the Medicare rebate. This is often called the ‘gap’.

When you’re making an appointment, be sure to ask what your out-of-pocket costs will be. If the cost isn’t something you can afford, discuss your options with your doctor.

Reviewing your plan

Your plan will need to be reviewed regularly. These reviews allow you to see how much progress you’ve made. If you’re meeting your goals – e.g. losing weight, increasing your fitness – that’s great. If you’re not getting there or having difficulties, a review will allow you to discuss this with your GP and work on solutions or adjust your goals.

Help!

It can seem overwhelming, but your GP and the practice nurse are there to support you on this journey.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore

Reference

(1) Chronic Disease Management Patient Information, Australian Government, Department of Health, 2014.


Caitlin-Radford-blog.jpg
28/Oct/2021

Photo by AUSVEG

Caitlin, a fifth-generation farmer from the northwest coast of Tasmania and Australian Apprentice of the Year 2020, shares her story about living with arthritis.

I was diagnosed with arthritis when I was 12, turning 13, and in grade 7.

I remember my first attack very well. We were on the Spirit of Tasmania heading over to Werribee for the 2011 Interschool Nationals (Equestrian) and on the boat I had a really sore hip. By the following night, the pain had become unbearable, so mum took me to the hospital. The staff took x-rays but couldn’t find what was causing my pain.

I was then transferred to the Royal Children’s Hospital, where I spent the next three days. After a series of ultrasounds and an MRI, they found a heap of fluid on my hip and diagnosed post-viral arthritis. Even with this diagnosis, I went on to compete and hobble around on crutches at Nationals!

When I got home to Tasmania, I went to my GP and was referred to a rheumatologist. It was then I was diagnosed with severe idiopathic rheumatoid arthritis. Then the journey began…???

Has your condition or living with pain impacted your social life, work, friends etc?

It had a huge impact on the rest of my high school years. I took prednisone daily for two or so years, which made me extremely puffy in the face. The people who knew what was going on were kind, but there were also some unkind people. It affected my confidence, I became depressed, moody and I didn’t even want to ride my ponies for a while.

Also, because I usually competed every weekend and rode a lot, I never really felt that I belonged with a particular group at school. And so, towards the end of school, I was quite happy to do homework in the art rooms at recess and lunch. I had some friends, but none who understood what it was like for me, or my lifestyle with the horses and farm, except for my best friend, who lived an hour away.

Since grade 12, life has been on the up and up. I’ve found my ‘people’ by developing greater friendships through horses, joining Rural Youth and getting involved with local agricultural networks where I fit in with like-minded people. Sometimes I’m exhausted and not up to some activities, but I know how to balance my life to keep myself healthy (most of the time! ?) and to be honest with how I’m feeling and when I need to take a break.

Work-wise, working for myself and my family is very handy as I can be more flexible around workload and how I do things. My family is super supportive and will help me in any way they can if I get sick, have an attack or need to go to appointments.

What’s life like living with arthritis?

Every day is different! When I was younger and trialling a lot of different medications, it was a rollercoaster to say the least! I would be nauseous all the time if I was on methotrexate, and tired to the point where I would fall asleep not long after getting home from school. Touch wood, it seems to be somewhat under control now.

I’ve found Actemra (tocilizumab) to be the best medication for me so far. I have an infusion at the hospital once a month. However, I’m starting a new medication next week due to the worldwide shortage of Actemra as they’ve been using it to treat people with COVID. So we’ll see how that goes, as it requires me to go back on to methotrexate.

I could’ve opted for a different medication, such as a daily tablet or self-injection, but I wasn’t a fan of those options. I self-injected twice weekly for a few years, and in the end, I couldn’t mentally do it anymore. I’d get worked up about having to do it, and I found the medication wasn’t working as well. With my busy lifestyle, sitting down in the hospital for a couple of hours once a month actually suits me quite well!

How does your condition impact working and running a farm?

Hydraulics were invented for a reason! Don’t get me wrong, it’s still a very physical job, but I enjoy it as it helps me stay fit and active.

When I’m fitter, I find I don’t get as sore, or I’m at least able to handle more exercise. I also find it helps me with my mental health too. I’m lucky to be able to run two of my own businesses. One through coaching dressage and beginner riders and creating freestyle music. The other is the farm with my partner that we lease from my grandparents. I find that long days in the tractor and very repetitive movements make me stiff and sore, but I’m sure many others find that as well.

Does horse riding help?

It helps in the fact that it takes my mind off the pain while I’m riding. I do feel it afterwards though! On the days I’m in so much pain that I struggle to walk, I can ride, and the horse can become my legs for an hour. When I was younger, I was graded as a para-athlete due to the effects of my arthritis. This wasn’t a bad thing as it allowed me to make so many connections with other para-athletes. I realised that I didn’t have it bad at all, and those I felt had it worse than me were often more determined and more able than some able-bodied riders I know! The only barrier is our mind and what we think we can do. So that really allowed me to push myself to be a better rider and then pass that on when teaching children or adults with learning or physical disabilities.

How important are strong connections – e.g. family, friends, partner – when you have arthritis and chronic pain?

Having a supportive team around you is essential. I’m lucky to have a very supportive family, and my partner Owen is amazing.

There can be days when I need help with basic things like getting undressed, getting into the shower and putting my hair up or the like. For the most part, I’m totally independent, but I know that when I am going through an attack, it won’t be pleasant, and I’ll need to rely on that support.

I also have Hashimoto’s disease and fibromyalgia, so it all hits my immune system hard. From restless legs to feeling pain for the smallest of things, it can be really frustrating. So to have people to comfort you when it gets too much is really important. Sometimes we all need a hug and to be told it’s all ok to get us through the day. ?

My best friend for the last 10 years has seen me go through everything, from being really sick to the healthiest I’ve been and everything in between. We’ve travelled overseas and look forward to more adventures, hopefully soon.

I first told my story publicly on Landline earlier this year. I had messages from people from all over thanking me for sharing my story and inspiring them to go for their dreams too. So to know that my story has helped others makes me so happy!

Do you have any tips for other people who have arthritis or other musculoskeletal conditions?

The biggest piece of advice that I can give is finding what makes you happy. When I’m focused, the rest seems to blur out. Get to know your body and what you can handle, find people in similar situations and ask them as many questions as you can, and then be that person for someone else. We are all in this together and shouldn’t feel alone! There’s no reason we can’t do the things we wish to do most in today’s world.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


pain-management-blog.jpg
28/Oct/2021

When you live with persistent or ongoing pain, it can sometimes feel like it’s taking over your life. And the usual things you do to manage your pain don’t seem to have the same effect.

This can significantly impact your ability to do your daily tasks, work, be social, and be active. It can also affect your sleep quality, your emotions and mental health. This can then exacerbate your pain and become a vicious cycle.

The good news is that there’s lots of support available to help you break this cycle.

Breaking the pain cycle

There is a range of different health professionals who can work with you to manage your persistent pain. You may see them on an ongoing basis, or you may visit them from time to time as needed.

Your general practitioner (GP) is central to your care and will help you access other health professionals and services. Make sure you have a doctor who knows you, at a practice that can see you when you need to be seen. Having the same doctor, rather than moving from one doctor to another, means that your care will be consistent and organised. This will lead to the best possible outcomes for you.

Physiotherapists (or physios) use a variety of techniques (e.g. exercise, massage, heat and cold) as well as education and advice to reduce pain to allow you to gradually increase your activity levels. They can also show you how to increase mobility, strength and functioning by developing an exercise program for you. Find a physio.

Exercise physiologists can help you improve your health and fitness through clinical exercise programs tailored to your specific needs and support to live a healthy lifestyle. Find an Accredited EP.

Occupational therapists (or OTs) help you learn better ways to do everyday activities such as bathing, dressing, working or driving. They can also provide information on aids and equipment to make daily activities easier. Find an OT.

Psychologists, psychiatrists and other mental health professionals can help you work through your feelings, particularly if you’re feeling anxious or depressed. They can also assist you with goal setting, prioritising activities and coping strategies.

Pharmacists can help you with information and advice about medications – both prescription and over-the-counter.

Pain specialists are doctors who’ve undergone additional training to diagnose and treat pain. They come from a variety of different medical specialties such as psychiatry, anaesthetics and general practice. They often work with a team of other health professionals to treat all aspects of your pain, from the physical, to the mental and emotional aspects

Pain management services and multidisciplinary pain clinics provide a holistic and coordinated approach to managing pain. Their programs are designed to specifically address the range of factors affecting your recovery, including:

  • physical factors
  • psychological issues, including your mood, stress or poor sleep
  • social factors including how you manage your activities at home and how you can return to work safely.

You’ll learn from health professionals such as doctors, physiotherapists, psychologists, occupational therapists and nurses how to manage your pain more effectively with the least side effects.

Talk with your doctor about whether a pain management program would be helpful for your situation. And check out the National Pain Services Directory by Pain Australia. It provides more information about the different types of pain services and a handy search function to find a service near you.

Family and friends can be a great source of support and encouragement, so keep them involved. How much or how little you tell them about your pain issues is up to you, but just knowing they’re there if you need them can be a great source of comfort.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


partners-hands.jpg
07/Oct/2021

The people in our lives bring so much colour and richness to our days. Our family and friends, work colleagues, local baristas, intimate partners, food deliverers, healthcare providers, neighbours, fellow gamers and dog walkers – all of the ordinary and intimate relationships we have are important and connect us to our world.

Apart from the warm fuzzies we get from having these people around us, healthy relationships are good for our physical and mental health. They help us feel less stressed, reduce feelings of loneliness, distract us from pain, boost our immune system and make us feel happier and more optimistic. They’re practically a tonic for all that ails!

And that’s why it’s so important that we nurture these relationships.

This is the first of two articles exploring ways we can tend to our close relationships, to ensure they remain strong and supportive. We begin with the relationship with a partner, spouse, or significant friend.

Physical vs emotional intimacy

When we think about intimate or close relationships, we often think of physical acts of intimacy – holding hands, cuddling, kissing, hugging and sex. They’re an essential element in our romantic relationships. But we also need emotional intimacy for deeper connections with those we have, or hope to have a committed relationship with.

Emotional intimacy involves each person opening up to the other, allowing their vulnerabilities to show, and sharing their deepest feelings and thoughts. To do this, each person needs to feel safe and supported to be themselves, ‘warts and all’. This level of intimacy takes time. And it requires open, honest communication and ongoing work.

“Intimacy is the capacity to be rather weird with someone
– and finding that that’s ok with them.” Alain de Botton

Emotional intimacy occurs not only within committed, romantic relationships, it can also happen within platonic relationships, for example, with your bestie, BFF, a sibling, or with someone else you have a close bond.

The following strategies are focused on nurturing romantic relationships, however most can be used for platonic relationships as well ?.

Strategies for nurturing your relationship

Share your deep, inner thoughts, feelings, beliefs, fears, needs, pain and worries – not just the superficial stuff.
To really develop that deep connection and understanding of each other, share the things that make you ‘you’. We’re all so different and have had different experiences, challenges, traumas, victories and lifestyles. This shapes who we are, and we tend to keep much of this to ourselves.

However, sharing these things with your partner over time creates intimacy as your relationship grows and deepens. This has to be a two-way street. You both need to be open and honest about the things that matter to you, as you feel comfortable and safe to do so.

“Never idealize others. They will never live up to your expectations.
Don’t over-analyze your relationships. Stop playing games.
A growing relationship can only be nurtured by genuineness.” Leo F. Buscaglia

Share how much they mean to you.
We all like to hear how much we mean to someone – especially when it’s out of the blue. Try not to become complacent with your relationship or take your partner for granted. Tell them how much you appreciate them and how much they bring to your life. Show them how much they mean to you – buy the book they’ve been wanting, prepare a picnic full of their favourite things, give them a hug, fold the laundry, place little love notes or tokens in unexpected places. Be creative and be honest ?

“Love is a two-way street constantly under construction.” Carroll Bryant

Share, learn and explore sexual desires so you both feel satisfied.
This adds to your emotional connection. However, sometimes our condition, pain, anxiety and the madness of life in general can impact our desire to be physically intimate. Check out our blog on sex, intimacy and musculoskeletal conditions for tips to help you get your groove back.

“Sex without love is merely healthy exercise.” Robert A. Heinlein

Share time together outside of your day-to-day routine.
Remember the excitement when you first met? The first thrilling time your hands brushed, when you couldn’t wait to see each other? Try to rekindle some of this excitement so that you get to be together as lovers, partners, friends – not as mum/dad/worker. Make the time to check in with each other, even when it feels like the world is taking over. This can be really challenging – we’re all so busy. So you may need to schedule time for this (not sexy, but often necessary). And make sure you unplug from all technology and put your phone away. It’s worth the effort. Take this time as a loving couple to talk about your day, feelings, needs, hopes and dreams, and just connect.

“A dream you dream alone is only a dream.
A dream you dream together is reality.” John Lennon

Share the difficulties, and where possible, work on solutions together.
If you have problems or difficulties that relate to your condition, job, other people etc – share them. Don’t keep them bottled up. Having someone to discuss your issues with can help bring clarity. Or at least help you feel your emotions are important and validated.

If the problems relate to your relationship or home life, this can be tougher. Especially if you both have strong feelings about the matter. In this case, it’s really important to be respectful to each other, listen, and work together to come up with a solution. And be prepared to compromise, so the solution feels fair to both of you. Remember, we’re all different, and we do and see things differently. This is a good thing (how boring would it be if everyone saw things the same way?), but it can sometimes be really frustrating. So if you become angry, take some time to breathe, reflect on the situation, and come back to it when you both feel calm.

However, sometimes it can be hard to get past an issue, and you may need external help to resolve it. See the section below on managing conflict.

“Nothing is perfect. Life is messy. Relationships are complex.
Outcomes are uncertain. People are irrational.” Hugh Mackay

Share the load.
We like to think of ourselves as superhuman at times and try to do it all without asking for help. Even when it may be needed ?. But this isn’t sustainable. We’ve all ended up in a heap doing this.

Again, it comes down to open, honest communication. Someone who doesn’t have a musculoskeletal condition can’t fully understand what it’s like, how frustrating it can be to be fine one day and thoroughly shagged the next. If there are things you’re struggling with – all the time, or just occasionally – discuss these with your partner. Look for ways to share the load – with your partner, children, housemates, other family members, or even hiring someone to do the chore/task.

“Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength,
while loving someone deeply gives you courage.” Lao-Tzu

Share fun times.
Make time for having fun, being silly and finding (and celebrating) the joy in life. This can be challenging when you live with pain, the uncertainty of living through a pandemic, work stress and household craziness. But it’s so rewarding. Watch a silly movie, dance in the back garden, share funny memes during your day, go skinny dipping after dark ?. Laughter and shared fun create another level of intimacy, as well as a twinkle to the eye and a healthy glow to the skin (especially if the water is cold ?).

“We’re all a little weird. And life is a little weird.
And when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours,
we join up with them and fall into mutually satisfying weirdness
– and call it love – true love.” Robert Fulghum

Have outside interests (and share yourself).
In case you’re starting to feel nauseated by all the saccharine togetherness ?, it’s also really essential that each person has independent interests. There are often things that make us really happy but are of no interest to our partner – think sports, book clubs, crafts, parents groups, community gardens, study groups, cooking classes, gaming etc. Instead of dragging your partner along, take that time for yourself. It helps you pursue the things that make you feel fulfilled, and you can share your experiences and happiness with your partner. When you both have these opportunities, life is more exciting and rewarding.

“A great relationship is about two things:
First, appreciating the similarities and second, respecting the differences.” Unknown

When it isn’t always smooth sailing: managing conflict

All of the suggestions we’ve provided require commitment, time and ongoing work. But sometimes you can work, and work hard, but arguments and conflict still arise. Especially when you’re living with the stress of unpredictable health issues, COVID-19, family commitments and all the other complicated things adulthood brings with it.

If you’re both committed to working through these issues, but feel like you can’t resolve them on your own, consider talking with someone you trust about it. This may be a close family friend or family member, or it may be a professional.

Getting help
Family Relationship Advice Line is an Australian Government service that helps families affected by relationship or separation issues. It can also refer callers to local services that provide assistance. Call 1800 050 321.

Relationships Australia provides a range of counselling services, delivered face-to-face and online. Find out more about the counselling services available on their website. Or call 1300 364 277.

Ending a relationship
If you’re not committed to resolving relationship issues and want to end it, Relationships Australia has resources to help you through this upsetting and stressful time.

Abuse or violence
It’s never OK to use power, abuse or violence against another person. If you need help, it’s available. For safety and support, call 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732) for confidential information, counselling and support. They operate 24 hours, 7 days a week.

Read the second instalment of this series: Nurturing relationships: Family and friends

“Maybe you don’t need the whole world to love you.
Maybe you just need one person.” Kermit the Frog

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


friends.jpg
07/Oct/2021

This is the second of two articles exploring ways we can tend to our close relationships, to ensure they remain strong and supportive. The first looked at the relationship with a partner, spouse, or significant friend. You can read it here

“Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another,
‘What! You too? I thought I was the only one” — C.S. Lewis

How often do you see a post on social media from a friend or family member and think, ‘it’s been ages since I’ve seen/called/talked with them…’? Or going about your day, you see something that triggers a memory of a great time with someone important to you, and you can’t remember when you last spoke?

It’s so easy for life to get away from us and lose contact with our family and good friends. Finding time amidst all of our other obligations, the general busyness of life, and let’s not forget COVID ?, can push staying in touch to the bottom of our ‘to do’ list. But this inattention and neglect can distance us from the significant people in our lives. And it’s during times like these that we need them, and they need us more than ever.

Healthy relationships are good for our physical and mental health. They help us feel less stressed, reduce feelings of loneliness, distract us from pain, boost our immune system and make us feel happier and more resilient. They provide support when our various health issues make us feel exhausted and sad. And they bolster our mood when the long days of COVID make everything seem so grey.

That’s why we need to nurture these relationships with our family and close friends.

Here are some strategies you can use:

Make them a priority.
Value your relationships and work hard to keep them strong. Tend to them as you would any living thing – with regular care and attention. Build time into your day/week/month for them, and make this time sacrosanct. How often you connect depends on the depth of the relationship; however, the important thing is to make it happen. Don’t let them fall by the wayside as if they’re unimportant.

Accept (and embrace) our differences.
We’re all different (and isn’t that amazing!), but that means we can have differences of opinions, beliefs and lifestyles that may cause friction from time to time. Accept that this is the case. These differences can challenge us to consider other viewpoints and opinions. They can lead to exciting discussions and debates. But they can also lead to conflict and anger. If this happens, take some time to breathe, reflect on the situation, and return to it when you both feel calm. This may be challenging at times, but if it’s something you can move past, or if you can agree to disagree, do so. However, if the issue isn’t something you can ignore or live with, or your relationship has changed to the point that it makes you unhappy, it may be time to re-evaluate the relationship.

Trust your peeps.
Trusting someone takes bravery and can make us feel vulnerable. But it also builds intimacy with another person. When this trust is reciprocal, you can share your deepest thoughts and fears without fear of judgement. You can ask for help when you’re in pain or feeling overwhelmed. Apart from how great it feels to know that you have someone in your corner who you can trust with your deepest and darkest, it also feels great to be on the receiving end of that trust.

Show your appreciation.
People are adaptive and become used to things very quickly. So it’s easy to start taking a person for granted when you’re so used to them being there, listening to you, providing support. We get used to these things and don’t notice them as much because they’re always there. So take notice. Tell them how much you appreciate them. Give them your full attention when they’re speaking. Thank them when they do something for you. Send them a note or a small present out of the blue to let them know that you’re thinking of them.

Schedule, schedule, schedule!
We’re always so busy, so it’s a good idea when catching up with someone important that you make a date for the next catch-up before you part ways. That way, you can both put it in your diaries, and you have a firm commitment.

Create alerts.
Again, we’re busy bees ?, and things can slip by without us pausing to take note. That’s why I put birthdays, anniversaries and other important dates in my calendar and create alerts for them. It might be an alert to call them on the date or one that gives me time to find a card and gift and post it to them in time.

Establish traditions and routines.
We tend to have friends and family members that we associate with specific things or activities. For example, the friend you work out with, the sister you go to galleries with, the mate you go to the cricket with, the friend who’s always up for a spontaneous adventure. Taking advantage of these traditions means that you can catch up and enjoy shared interests. Win, win!

Share your interests.
We’re all looking for recommendations for books, movies, TV shows, podcasts etc (especially during lockdowns!). Share what you’re reading, watching or listening to, and your opinions. Create a discussion group – that sounds so formal ? – but it could occur during happy hour, video chat, social media or a walk around the park.

Call them.
Never underestimate the power of simply picking up the phone and having a chat, even a quick one.

Connect IRL.
Endless lockdowns and border closures have made connecting in real life so much sweeter. So if you can, and it’s safe to do so, catch up with your peeps in person for a walk, picnic, coffee, bike ride…whatever works for you.

Send photos.
With a smartphone, we can easily share our lives with important people. I’m not a selfie person, but I do take pics of things I see – a sunrise, a dog taking its owner for a walk, or a fantastic meal I can’t believe I cooked. The ordinary things that mean a lot to me and the people I share them with. And in return, I get pics from their days. It provides a glimpse into the everyday of lives, especially if we can’t be there in person.

Value the quick connections.
How often do you put off a call or catch up because you don’t think you have time? Not all of our connections need to be long or deep, and meaningful. A quick call to say hello, a silly selfie, a short text, or a quick email can help sustain relationships between the longer catch-ups.

Pay attention to how you feel.
Next time you’re with your close family or friends, pay attention to how you feel when you’re with them. How’s your mood compared to how it is when you haven’t seen them in a while? Even when they drive us crazy, we usually feel happy and more content when we spend time with these people.

Learn to forgive.
People have the power to hurt us. This can make us feel angry, sad and a whole host of other emotions. But we can control how we choose to deal with the hurt and our feelings. We can stew and brood – but this only makes us feel bad. Or we can forgive the person for the pain they caused. This doesn’t mean it’s forgotten or that the offense is suddenly excused or ok. It simply means that you’re taking control of the way you feel and healing the hurt. But it’s not always easy, so for some tips read, Eight keys to forgiveness from The Greater Good Science Center.

Apologise.
On the flip side of forgiveness is knowing when you’ve hurt others and when to apologise. This can be really tough because it’s hard to acknowledge that we’ve hurt someone or done something wrong. But it’s necessary to heal a relationship. It’s also crucial that we respect the other person’s feelings and that they may not be ready to forgive immediately. Be gentle and take time.

Allow for spontaneity.
Sometimes you just need to toss your schedules and chores out the window and be spontaneous!! Call the friend who’s always up for an adventure or the one in need of some good, old-fashioned fun, and throw caution to the wind. Go on a road trip, hit the shops, have a movie marathon. Whatever works for you and brings you together ?.

“There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends.
I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.” — Jane Austen

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore


jenny-blog-pic-1.jpg
04/Aug/2021

Written by Jenny Hill

Hi, my name’s Jennifer, but I also answer to Jen, Jenny, Jen Jen and for many years during primary school – ‘Skippy’ (as in The Bush Kangaroo!). I’m 39 years old and was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis (JA) when I was in grade 4.

My memories of my initial symptoms, diagnosis and treatments are a little hazy, given it was 30 years ago, but my mum has provided a timeline of my journey and our experiences. I suggest you read her blog before mine.

My first experience of the pain that I’d later identify as JA followed a routine sprain of my left ankle. It didn’t seem to heal properly, leaving me with permanent swelling, immobility and terrible pain. I quickly went from playing netball and water skiing to crawling to get around the house.

Despite seeing an array of GPs and other health professionals, there was no explanation as to why my joints were so painful.

When I was finally diagnosed with juvenile arthritis, I felt some relief amidst the initial confusion and shock. There was something wrong; it wasn’t in my head, it had a name, and there were treatments for it.

I spent that first year adapting to my new lifestyle.

During school recesses, I’d sit in a courtyard adjacent to my classroom, observing my friends who found ways to play close by. I read as many books as I could to distract myself from boredom and pain. I took drama classes instead of competing in my beloved netball. I learnt how to style my hair to cover my baldness when my hair fell out. Before I visited the hospital, I focused on the treat of a McDonalds burger rather than the painful examinations. I learnt how to ‘save up’ my strength and pain tolerance for special days such as excursions. When I could walk, I learnt that the only way to try and keep up with others was to re-work my limp (which made me look like a pretty clumsy kangaroo!). I don’t think that I ever believed that this could be permanent. I just took it day by day.

Looking back on these early years – despite the pain and frustrating cycles of treatments or reactions to medication – I can’t help but think that I was lucky in many ways. During primary school, I didn’t experience bullying. I had a large number of friends who took turns sitting with me when I couldn’t play. My teachers tried hard to understand my diagnosis and were very supportive. Having three siblings meant I was rarely lonely, as there was always at least one of them at home who I could torment from the couch! And I had parents who were 100% on my team, reorganising their lives around me, fighting uphill battles with doctors, sitting up with me on painful nights, and showing me patience – never frustration.

I eventually had periods of remission that brought a lot of relief but also a lot of anger, frustration and sadness when symptoms reappeared and interrupted my life. I stopped talking about my JA. It was too hard, and I believed no one could understand. Thankfully though, remission followed me into high school!

I moved onto high school, where I was in classes with a few students from primary school. It was cool having different subjects to study and getting to know new friends. By then, I found it considerably easier to walk distances and even play some netball without too much pain! It was no longer so obvious that I had anything physically wrong with me.

This made it very difficult for me when I had my weeks or days of flare-ups, when the pain would suddenly and viciously return. This was sometimes due to spending too long on my feet shopping and hanging out with my friends, or for no particular reason at all. When this happened, I grew incredibly self-conscious, angry and embarrassed and the last thing I wanted to do was try to explain myself to new friends.

I couldn’t even make sense of it myself.

I tried to hide it from friends, often socially disconnecting, spending lunch alone in the library and wagging P.E classes. I felt quite low during these periods and resorted to denial. I tried to deny the whole situation, even when a friend told me his mum saw an article about my JA experience in New Idea magazine. I flat out denied it (though I think the photos of me in the article gave me away!).

Thankfully, I was invited to attend camps for young people run by the Arthritis Foundation of Victoria (now Musculoskeletal Australia) around this time. At first, I was hesitant to go. But once I got there, I was amazed to be with people my age going through the same stuff, with the same limitations and experiences. It provided a space to let down my guard, have fun, talk about my arthritis without it being a big deal, and have space to vent and complain about things with people who totally got it.

There was no point denying my arthritis around these people or that I was feeling pretty low and angry at times…we all did.

I remember how all the young people had their cortisone shots just before camp so they could participate in the activities. And how at the end of the day, when all our joints were aching, we’d commandeer the spare wheelchairs and motor scooters for a game of wheelie basketball. This peer support didn’t entirely cure how I felt, but it did mark a change in my attitude towards my arthritis and a shift in my social life.

I was more outspoken to friends about my past experiences and current limitations. I found that most people didn’t have lots of questions anyway. We were teenagers, and everyone was wrapped up in themselves!

My pain became quite manageable over the next couple of years. I even wore high heels to my middle school formal – medication-free! However, I still struggled with depression at times and eventually left school.

I went back to school and then to university. I got my Master’s Degree and have spent over 10 years working as a youth worker and in academia.

Apart from the odd flare-ups here and there, I’ve remained in remission. I’ve enjoyed many travel adventures and weekends at music festivals (often on the edge of the dancefloor with friends who know my physical limitations!). I even went on a solo hike around an island in Japan for a month, camping out in a tent!

I’ve also developed osteoporosis, but that’s another story.

As fantastic as it is that there’s growing recognition of the physical toll that JA puts on a young person, it’s essential to consider the psychological and social impact of JA on young people (and on their incredible families). The transition from primary to high school was challenging for me. I believe I would’ve had a much easier time if I’d had access to peer support and targeted mental health support.

If you’ve enjoyed reading my blog, check out my mum’s blog.

Jenny Hill


jenny-and-cathy-blog-pic.jpg
04/Aug/2021

Our journey of discovery with juvenile arthritis

Written by Cathy Hill

Arthritis isn’t something you expect to hear your nine-year-old daughter has, but that’s what we were hearing as Jenny and I sat in the rheumatologist’s office in 1991. We’d gone from one doctor to the next, trying to find out what was wrong with Jenny’s ankle, which we thought she’d sprained, but the swelling wouldn’t go down.

Jenny enjoyed playing netball and was a very proficient player. However, a few months earlier she’d tripped over a log after playing netball. Her ankle became swollen and wouldn’t improve. The usual treatments of ice, compression, elevation and rest, did nothing to ease what we assumed was a sprained ankle.

A chiropractor had successfully treated me after I’d had a similar injury, so we took Jenny to see him. After a few sessions with no improvement, he suggested we go to our GP for blood tests, as he felt the problem was ‘something internal’. Our GP refused to listen to what the chiropractor suggested and told Jenny to ‘jump up and down on the trampoline. This upset us, as Jenny had difficulty walking let alone jumping on a trampoline! Our chiropractor then recommended a GP who he felt would listen to us. This GP sent Jenny to have blood tests and then referred Jenny to the rheumatologist we were speaking to now.

We were shocked to think that a 9-year-old could have arthritis. This doctor assured us that it could be treated and that Jenny could lead a healthy and active life. He started her on Voltaren, which certainly brought down the swelling but gave Jenny stomach pains. The doctor then decided to send Jenny to a paediatric rheumatologist at The Royal Children’s Hospital where they were able to successfully change her medication. After a couple of months Jenny’s condition had improved so much that it was declared that Jenny was in remission and she was able to stop the medication.

Unfortunately, this improvement was short-lived, and after another fall at netball Jenny’s right ankle swelled up, this time even worse. Jenny wasn’t able to walk on that leg at all, and I would drop her as close to her classroom as possible so that she could virtually crawl into her classroom. Thankfully she had a very good group of friends who stayed with her at playtimes in the courtyard right outside their room. Jenny would crawl inside the house, and I would have to lift her into the bath at night. Because we’d been told that she was in remission, we decided to try another form of treatment, this time a local naturopath who had been recommended to us. That treatment didn’t work, and Jenny’s foot was not only terribly swollen, but was also sticking out at almost a 45-degree angle from where it should have been!

We didn’t know what to do, so we went back to the GP who originally referred us to the first rheumatologist. He suggested that we try an orthopaedic surgeon who told us that Jenny’s bones in her ankle had fused together, but unfortunately at an unnatural angle. He wanted to be absolutely sure that he was doing the right thing to help Jenny, so he asked us to take her into St Vincent’s Hospital where she would participate in a ‘round table’ of various doctors. The doctors agreed with the orthopaedic surgeon’s first thought that he would manipulate Jenny’s foot under general anaesthetic and put it in a fibreglass cast for 6 weeks. This was done at the beginning of 1992, and thankfully the result was that her foot was at a much more normal angle. However, the foot was still swollen, so it was recommended that we go back to see the rheumatology team at the Children’s.

So began a series of X-rays and scans, new medication, regular physiotherapy, eye check-ups, and included visits to a lady who specialised in ligament damage, and who treated members of the Australian Ballet as well as AFL footballers. I had to do exercises twice daily with Jenny, which resulted in many arguments. I had returned to full-time teaching at the end of 1991, so it was difficult enough getting four children off to school in the mornings and then getting to my own school, as well as finding the time to do the exercises with a reluctant patient! Jenny’s right leg had lost a lot of muscle tone while in the cast, and together with the fused ankle meant that she was not walking properly. It was imperative that we do those exercises, but at that time it was hard for Jenny to understand that, especially as it caused her pain.

We’d contacted the Arthritis Foundation of Victoria (now Musculoskeletal Australia) for support, and they told us about the camps they ran for children with arthritis. Jenny’s rheumatologist was very keen for Jenny to attend, as he was sometimes involved with the camps. Before she attended the first camp, he wanted Jenny to have ultrasound-guided cortisone injections in her foot, under a twilight sedative. He assured us that it was routine for the children to have cortisone injections right before the camps so they could get the most out of the camp activities. Over the next few years Jenny was able to participate in three camps, including one in Sydney with children from all over Australia. The camps were extremely beneficial for Jenny, and indeed all the participants. There were children with all different types of arthritis, some in wheelchairs, and they were offered a wide range of activities which they wouldn’t normally be able to participate in, such as scuba diving.

In 1993, in grade 6, Jenny noticed that when brushing her hair she would have clumps of hair in her brush. She was losing hair in patches. The doctor thought this was probably due to stress. We approached Jenny’s teacher and asked whether she could wear a beanie inside as well as outside, but her teacher said that as they had a policy of no hats inside, it would only serve to draw more attention to her. We could see her reason, so asked our hairdresser whether she thought she could do anything to help. She was able to tie Jenny’s hair back into a ‘half up-half down’ hairstyle, which did a pretty good job of covering the bald patches. Jenny was in a great class with generally very caring kids, so she thankfully didn’t have problems with teasing. Grade 6 also meant school production, and this is where we realised Jenny had a great flair for acting. She committed herself to learning her lines and songs and was cast in one of the lead roles – a little dog called Puddles, who had a ‘wee’ little problem! Looking back now I wonder whether the involvement in the production provided an escape from the arthritis and pain.

Secondary school had its ups and downs. It involved a new set of teachers and a new bunch of kids, mixed in with some friends from primary school. With a letter from her rheumatologist, Jenny was given permission to wear Doc Marten shoes, which gave her right ankle extra support and allowed for the orthotics that had been made for her at the Children’s. The orthotics were used to absorb shock rather than provide arch support like my own orthotics. With the fused ankle Jenny did walk quite flat-footed, but arch supports wouldn’t have helped. Later on it would affect Jenny’s driving, but eventually she found that certain cars that enabled her to sit forwards over the wheel allowed a better angle for her foot, as the fusion of the ankle meant that there was little movement up and down.

At secondary school Jenny had her group of friends from primary school as well as other new friends. However, continuing flare-ups meant that she would often go and find a quiet place by herself at school, which affected some of her friendships. At the time we weren’t always aware of how much pain she was in, otherwise we would’ve asked her doctor whether there was anything else Jenny could take for the pain.

Jenny immersed herself in the music program at school, and we went to several music concerts. She still had a great interest in drama and was enrolled in a local drama school where she took part in several productions. Jenny was able to participate in netball again, although she was confined to the goal third of the court where she became quite a proficient shooter!

When Jenny was 15, her rheumatologist considered that she was in remission, so she was able to stop her medication. She’s now 39 and has chosen to eat a vegan diet, and although Jenny can still have flare-ups of pain in her joints she’s no longer dependent on any arthritis medication.

If you’ve enjoyed reading my blog, check out my daughter’s blog.

Cathy Hill


LizBlog.jpg
14/Jul/2021

I have been in pain for 60+ years. I started to have severe back pain in my early teens. I remember sitting at my desk propping myself up to relieve the pain by resting my ribs on the desk. The pain affected me academically and sports-wise at school. I found standing and walking difficult and still do. My back pain was not correctly diagnosed until I ruptured a disc some 25 years later and it was then that I was diagnosed with Scheuermann`s disease.

My ruptured disc was removed and the surgeon told me my back was a mess and to go home to bed and stay there. Thankfully, I decided I didn’t want to do that so found a very good physio and did 3 sessions a week with her and aqua exercises every day for 3 years. I was partially paralysed in the right leg but slowly I began to walk again. She said I needed to keep moving and to keep fit which was very good advice! So, I decided to start farming as I had always wanted to do this even though you have to be mad to do it with long hours and very little financial reward! This was the best decision ever.

In 2013, I was diagnosed with arthritis in both hips and had both replaced. It has since appeared in my hands, spine, left shoulder and just recently it has been diagnosed in both knees. It makes moving around difficult, but I know I must keep moving or I will seize up. My hands cause problems due to lack of strength so opening bottles and so forth can be very frustrating. I am still working full time as this gives me the motivation to get out of bed each day and keeps me mobile. I have also been diagnosed with osteomalacia, bursitis, tendonitis, carpal tunnel, Sjogren’s syndrome and neuropathic pain in both feet so my musculoskeletal conditions are wide and varied!

I have put together my top ten tips that I have found useful – I hope you find them so too.

My tips

  1. Keep pain where it is. Don’t let it get into your head.
  2. Don`t catastrophise. Pain is just an indication that something is not quite right. Don`t let pain be number one in your life. There are more aspects to you than your pain.
  3. Don`t ask “Why me?” as the answer is “Why not you?” More than 7 million Australians live with a musculoskeletal condition, so you’re not alone.
  4. Focus on what you can do rather than what you can’t do. Grieve over the loss but don`t dwell on it. Unfortunately, we all naturally lose function as we grow older which can be hard to accept.
  5. Take the responsibility for your health into your own hands. Get informed and be your own advocate. You know your body best as you live with it so speak up when you know something is not right.
  6. Eat well. You only have one body so give it the best care possible.
  7. Keep moving and keep those joints active. Pacing can help you get through the day.
  8. Learn to do things differently, e.g. lifting or getting in and out of cars. Try other ways of doing things to see what works for you.
  9. Each new challenge gives us a choice between being bitter or better. Bitter is soul-destroying and unpleasant for others. I choose better because I want to grow personally and to be my best self.
  10. Be grateful every day for something.

Our guest blogger

Liz got in touch with us after taking part in our 2020 national consumer survey. She kindly shared her story and her tips for living well with pain.


piggy-bank.jpg
01/Apr/2021

Not much has changed since ABBA sang in 1976 “All the things I could do, if I had a little money.” Money – or the lack of it – has been giving people headaches and causing stress since we first started using it.

In our report Making the invisible visible, 65% of respondents reported that they’d experienced financial stress due to having a musculoskeletal condition. The most common causes for this were:

  • cost of specialist appointments: 50%
  • cost of allied health appointments: 46%
  • cost of medications: 39%
  • cost of surgery: 19%.

Living with a musculoskeletal condition – or multiple conditionscan be expensive. Medications, healthcare appointments, time off work (or not being able to work), exercise classes, complementary therapies, and aids and equipment, are costly on top of everyday expenses.

When you add a global pandemic into the mix, and the problems it has caused in terms of work for so many people, financial stress is almost inevitable.

Wow, that’s grim. But fortunately, there are things you can do if you’re in this situation. And it starts now.

Acknowledge the situation. This is the crucial first step. As much as we’d like to bury our head in the sand when we feel anxious or worried about anything, it won’t solve the problem. We need to look it in the eye, acknowledge it exists and start to deal with it – one step at a time.

Create a budget. This may sound daunting, but you need to know where your money is going. You need to be able to track what money is coming in, and what you’re spending it on. MoneySmart is an Australian Government website that has lots of tools and resources to help you manage your money. They have a section on budgeting to help you create a budget that works for you and your circumstances.

By understanding where your money’s going, you can start to see where you can make some savings or cut some costs. It will also put you in a better position when/if it comes time to talk with your bank, utility companies etc.

Know your rights. When you’re struggling and stressed it’s easy to become overwhelmed. But there are laws to help protect you if you’re suffering from financial hardship. The National Debt Helpline has information to help you understand your rights and protections.

Seek help. If you’re finding it challenging to create a budget, or find a way out of your financial problems, contact the National Debt Helpline and talk with a financial counsellor. They’re free, confidential, and independent. You can use the live chat function on their website or you can call them on 1800 007 007 weekdays 9.30am-4.30pm. They also have a huge range of other resources to help you if you’re struggling with debt or getting your finances under control.

Talk to your bank. If you’re having difficulties paying your mortgage, personal loans or credit card repayments, talk with your lender about your options, such as making smaller repayments over a longer period or pausing repayments.

The Australian Banking Association has some useful resources on their website, including information about your rights and what your bank can do to help you.

Talk to your utility companies. If you can’t afford to pay your water, gas, electricity and phone bills, contact your supplier. But first, check out this information from the National Debt Helpline about how to do this.

Be wary of buy now, pay later schemes, payday loans, and consumer leases. If you’re under financial stress, these options may seem like a convenient way to pay for things you need. However, they’re also an easy way to get into even more debt. Read this information from MoneySmart to find out more about the potential problems with payday loans, consumer leases, and buy now pay later schemes.

Talk with your doctor about GP management plans. Living with a chronic condition (or multiple conditions) can cost a lot of money. Discuss accessing a GP Management Plan and Team Care Arrangement with your doctor so that you can get coordinated care to manage your health condition. You may also be eligible for Medicare rebates for certain allied health services. You can find out more on the Department of Health website.

Talk with your doctor and pharmacist about safety nets. They exist to help lower the out of pocket medical costs for people who, due to their health condition/s, spend a lot of money on:

Your doctor and pharmacist can give you more information about these safety nets. You can also find out more by clicking on the links above.

Find out about government allowances and benefits. The Australian Government provides a wide range of allowances and benefits you may be eligible for including:

The Australian Government’s Services Australia website provides a lot of information about these payments (and others), including information about eligibility criteria.

You can also talk with our nurses on the MSK Help Line if you’re having trouble navigating your way through these social services schemes. Contact them on 1800 263 265 weekdays or email helpline@msk.org.au.

Find out about the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The NDIS helps people under the age of 65 with permanent and significant disability get care and supports. It pays for reasonable and necessary supports that a person needs to live and enjoy their life. The NDIS also provides information and connections to local services to people who aren’t eligible for funding. Find out more about the NDIS.

There’s light at the end of the tunnel. When you’re in debt or dealing with financial hardship, it can seem like there’s no way out. But there are a lot of organisations and services available to help you. This article has just scraped the surface of them. There are more for you to explore in the links below.

If you need help with debt, or if you just want to learn how to manage your money better, I would urge you to look at MoneySmart, National Debt Help Line and The Salvos. They really provide excellent, easy to understand resources on a wide range of issues relating to money.

Contact our free national Help Line

If you have questions about managing your pain, your musculoskeletal condition, treatment options, mental health issues, COVID-19, telehealth, or accessing services be sure to call our nurses. They’re available weekdays between 9am-5pm on 1800 263 265; email (helpline@msk.org.au) or via Messenger.

More to explore




Musculoskeletal Australia (or MSK) is the consumer organisation working with, and advocating on behalf of, people with arthritis, osteoporosis, back pain, gout and over 150 other musculoskeletal conditions.

Useful Links


Recent Posts

Copyright by Musculoskeletal Australia 2022. All rights reserved

ABN: 26 811 336 442ACN: 607 996 921